13th Americas Spectrum Management Conference

Event Overview

The 13th Americas Spectrum Management Conference will take place on October 1-2, 2024 in Washington D.C. at the Washington Plaza Hotel. 

Registration is now available – secure your place here.

Across 2 days attendees will have the opportunity to be involved in discussions on the key spectrum topics for the Americas region and beyond, through interactive sessions, networking opportunities, an exhibition area and much more.

This event is part of The Global Spectrum Series. The world’s largest collection of regional spectrum policy conferences. Click on the images on the left to find out more about the series and to the event vlog from last year.

  • Event Vlog

    Highlights from the event in Washington D.C. in October 2023
  • Global Spectrum Series

    This event takes place as part of the Global Spectrum Series - the world’s largest collection of regional spectrum policy conferences.

Key Themes

Hover over the image to find out more…

  • The National Spectrum Strategy

  • Outcomes of WRC-23 & the path towards WRC-27

  • The spectrum pipeline

    mid-band and beyond
  • Spectrum sharing models and trends

  • Rural connectivity and subsidy programmes

  • Meeting connectivity needs of an evolving satellite sector

    Spectrum roadmaps and outlooks
  • Direct-to-device connectivity

  • A spectrum roadmap for 6G

  • CBRS 2.0

  • Meeting the needs of vertical users and private networks

Event Background

Launched in 2012, and now in its thirteenth year, The Americas Spectrum Management Conference takes place annually in Washington D.C., with the exception of fully virtual editions in 2020 and 2021.

 

Over 200 delegates joined 2 days of discussions in October 2023. Watch the event vlog below to find out more.

Organisers & Partners

Organised by

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Platinum Partners

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CTIA.png
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GSOA.png
HPE.png
Intelsat.png
LYA.png
Lynk.png
Meta.png
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Nokia-logo.png
OnGo-Alliance.png
Qualcomm.png
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SIA-website.png
T-mobile.png
Verizon.png
WinnForum.png

Silver Partners

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Gold Partners

DSA.png
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Shure.png
UWB-alliance.png
Womble-Bond-Dickinson-logo-350x194-1.png

Exhibitors & Networking Partners

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Knowledge Partners

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NERA

Last Year's Speakers Included

Steve-Lang-240

Steve Lang

Deputy Assistant Secretary, State for International Information & Communications Policy, US Department State;
Head US Delegation for WRC-23

Austin-Bonner-240

Austin Bonner

Deputy U.S. Chief Technology Officer for Policy
White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

Scott Blake Harris 240

Scott Blake Harris

Senior Spectrum Advisor, Office of the Assistant Secretary
NTIA

Jessica-Greffenius-240-1

Jessica Greffenius

Assistant Chief, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau
FCC

David Willis 240

David Willis

Group Director, Spectrum
Ofcom

Scott-Patrick-240

Scott Patrick

Executive Director, Office of Spectrum Management
NTIA

Steve-Lang-240

Steve Lang

Deputy Assistant Secretary, State for International Information & Communications Policy, US Department State;
Head US Delegation for WRC-23

Austin-Bonner-240

Austin Bonner

Deputy U.S. Chief Technology Officer for Policy
White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

Scott Blake Harris 240

Scott Blake Harris

Senior Spectrum Advisor, Office of the Assistant Secretary
NTIA

Jessica-Greffenius-240-1

Jessica Greffenius

Assistant Chief, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau
FCC

David Willis 240

David Willis

Group Director, Spectrum
Ofcom

Scott-Patrick-240

Scott Patrick

Executive Director, Office of Spectrum Management
NTIA

You can view the agenda in your preferred time zone by selecting it from the list below.
Day One
2024-10-01
Day Two
2024-10-02
09:00 - 09:40
Keynote Presentations
09:40 - 10:45
Session 1: The National Spectrum Strategy – key objectives, timelines and the path ahead

Following the release of the National Spectrum Strategy (NSS) last year, the NTIA published the NSS Implementation Plan (I-Plan) in March of this year, which looked to identify more concretely the next steps and path ahead in the four pillars that have been identified: Spectrum pipeline, Long-term collaborative planning, spectrum access through technology development and workforce development. This session will look at the key objectives that have been set as part of the NSS, the timeframe and targets that have been outlined as part of the I-Plan, and the broad path ahead as the implementation of the strategy begins. With 2,786 MHz of spectrum across 5 different bands identified to be studied for repurposing, in order to help fuel ‘next-generation services’, the session will explore the work that now lies ahead, and the extent to which the NSS can help to meet the objectives that have been set of delivering U.S. leadership in wireless technologies.
 

  • How ambitious is the NSS and to what extent can these ambitions be met?
  • What potential does each of the 5 bands that make up the 2,786MHz of spectrum identified to be studied as part of the NSS offer in terms of helping to meet future connectivity requirements?
  • What technical studies are underway and are any early results emerging?
  • What timelines have been set for these studies to take place and are these timelines realistic?
  • Has the NSS got the right balance in terms of considering both licenced and unlicenced spectrum users, and to finding additional spectrum for space development and specific uses like drones and automobiles alongside terrestrial mobile?
  • What role can dynamic sharing models play going forward to help maximise the efficiency of key spectrum bands, and is the focus given to this as part of the NSS the right way to go?
  • How are other sharing methods covered and what different approaches should be considered
  • What are the key targets and objectives that have been set as part of ‘long-term collaborative planning’ and ‘workforce development’ pillars?
  • To what extent could a potential change in administration in this year’s election affect the long-term plans for the strategy?
10:45 - 11:10
Refreshment Break
11:10 - 12:15
Session 2: WRC-23 and WRC-27 – working together to deliver on national and regional goals and priorities

Almost a year has now passed since the crucial World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-23) in Dubai. Stakeholders across the US and the Americas have had time to reflect on the decisions that were taken on key agenda items, assess their impact, and consider the next steps. This session will take the opportunity to look back on the conference, to examine the key objectives that were set by the US and the wider Americas region (through CITEL), and the extent to which these were met. It will then look forward to WRC-27, and with the second CITEL PCC.II meeting being held a week before this conference, discuss the positions that are emerging and the significant topics that will likely dominate discussions over the next 4 years. It will ask if there are any lessons that can be taken from the experiences at WRC-23 and look at what preparation already needs to begin to ensure a successful ‘cycle’ for the region this time around.
 

  • What were the key priorities for the US and the broader CITEL region going into WRC-23 and to what extent were these achieved?
  • In which agenda items was it not possible to achieve fully coordinated outcomes across the Americas, and what mechanisms and footnotes were introduced as a result of this? What flexibilities do these then allow, and what are likely to be the next steps?
  • What lessons can be gleaned from the conference to inform and improve participation in the following preparatory meetings and future WRCs?
  • Are there improvements that could be made at a national and CITEL level in order to improve the preparatory processes and add additional influence to the regional ‘voice’ and positions?
  • Moving forward, what are the main agenda items up for discussion at WRC-27 and what timeline or framework for studies in these areas can be expected?
  • What outcomes were seen at the 2nd PCC.II meeting last week? To what extent are regional and national positions emerging (or potentially shifting) in the post-WRC environment? In which areas and agenda items are we seeing early movement towards a regional consensus, and in which areas are positions less aligned?
  • Are trends being seen towards either increased or decreased coordination and harmonization of spectrum policies across Region 2? How can regulators and policymakers continue to balance the need to consider the diverse spectrum needs and priorities of their own country, whilst also considering how this could affect the path towards WRC-27 and the overall influence of the region at the conference itself?
12:15 - 13:00
Session 3: A spectrum strategy to ensure global leadership – balancing the need to meet national targets with the need for international coordination

The focus of the opening two sessions of this conference has been on the national spectrum strategy and WRC-23, both of which are expected to play a big part in shaping the future spectrum environment, despite coming from different angles. Whilst the NSS focusses specifically on domestic challenges and requirements; the purpose of WRC-23 is to foster regional and global coordination, to avoid cross-border interference and to unlock benefits that will come as part of this. This highlights one of the major challenges for national regulators – to find the balance between the need to move quickly and take decisions based on specific national requirements, whilst also working alongside international partners to coordinate policy decisions and approaches. This session will discuss this in detail and look at the approach taken in recent years, the trends that are being seen today, and where the balance lies in delivering a spectrum strategy that maintains a position of global leadership.
 

  • How does the spectrum ecosystem in the US and other countries in the Americas differ from that in other countries and regions around the world? What challenges and opportunities could this provide?
  • Over recent years, the US has been a first mover globally when taking decisions on key bands (for example 600MHz, 6GHz, mmWave; and the Supplemental Coverage from Space (SCS) regulatory framework). To what extent have these been the correct decisions?
  • Is there a risk that moving early could lead to potential isolation if others don’t take the decision to follow? What impact could this have if so?
  • Is the US market large enough to mean that economies of scale are not overly affected, or could this be a risk to the US’s global leadership position? How important is coordination to those countries in the region with smaller regional markets?
  • How can the balance be found between taking decisions quickly based on specific national requirements and the need for international coordination?
  • How can regulators across the region work together to deliver global leadership across the region, whilst also ensuring that their respective national priorities and objectives are met?
13:00 - 14:00
Lunch
14:00 - 15:05
Session 4: The mid-band ecosystem – balancing the need for spectrum for IMT with the requirements of other federal and commercial users

With its balance of speed, capacity, coverage, and penetration for cellular wireless networks, mid-band spectrum is crucial for 5G. Given its early focus on mmWave frequencies for 5G rollout, the US was initially playing catch-up when it came to making sufficient mid-band, but a big push has subsequently taken place to free up additional bandwidth in ranges such as the C-band and CBRS. So where does the US stand now? This session will discuss how much spectrum is now available for the continued growth of IMT, how this compares to other countries in the Americas and to other regions, and at whether the right balance has been reached in the band when it comes to making spectrum available for different users and uses.

  • Where does the US stand compared to other regions in terms of the amount of mid-band spectrum available for mobile, and the ways in which it is available (full power exclusive use, shared use etc.)?
  • To what degree is the potential of key mid-bands being maximised, and are there still ways that they can be utilised more efficiently and effectively? Have we found the best use for the mid-band spectrum?
  • Is there enough mid-band spectrum available for future growth and development of commercial mobile services? If not, then how much more is needed and where can it come from?
  • What impact could changes proposed through the new ‘CBRS 2.0’ model have on the way in which spectrum in that band is used and on the overall usefulness for mobile operators?
  • To what extent do other key users like satellite, WiFi and military have adequate access to sufficient mid-band spectrum to meet their present and future requirements?
  • What should be considered as the range for the ‘sweet-spot’ of mid-band spectrum that is so vital for IMT? What are the propagation and penetration characteristics of bands such as the 7-8GHz and 12GHz frequencies, and how may this affect their usefulness for IMT and 5G?
  • Is there scope for more military spectrum to be made available, and how can this be incentivised? If not, then what other options are there?
  • To what extent could bands such as the lower 3GHz band, the 7-8GHz band or the 4GHz band be options to deliver additional bandwidth?
  • Could there ever be scope to free up more from other commercial users (satellite or others)?
15:05 - 15:30
Refreshment Break
15:30 - 16:25
Session 5: Spotlight on CBRS 2.0 – what can be expected from the next phase?

Earlier this year, a major set of enhancements were made to the 3-tiered sharing model that is used within the CBRS band. ‘CBRS 2.0’ has been heralded by proponents as a major step forward, with greater performance, reliability, and reduced interference being promised. The session will look at the changes that have been applied, and the impact that they could have on the usability and value of this key mid-band spectrum for all of the users in the band. With critics saying to-date that the level of use in the band by mobile use has been relatively low, partly due to the disruption from incumbent military activities in the identified Dynamic Protection Areas (DPAs), to what extent can these new changes address these issues and what will this mean for the future use of the band?
 

  • What lessons have been learnt during the CBRS ‘journey’ so far, and how have these been taken into account when developing CBRS 2.0?
  • What changes are being proposed to the Dynamic Protection Areas (DPAs) and DPA neighbourhoods? What impact will this have on the usability of the available spectrum, and how is it being ensured that the protection of interference is still central?
  • To date, there is an argument that mobile operators haven’t really been using their PAL licence. Is this because the power restrictions and the sharing make this unattractive or is it just lower down the list of priorities and it will eventually be well used? How may the introduction of ‘CBRS 2.0’ impact this?
  • What impact could CBRS 2.0 have more broadly on the different users, and particularly on unlicenced users in the General Authorized Access (GAA) tier?
  • To what extent could the changes proposed as part of CBRS 2.0 make it more appealing as a model to explore in other bands in the future?
16:25 - 17:30
Session 6: The continual evolution of spectrum sharing – ensuring a ‘win-win’ for all users

As the demands of our hyper-connected world outpace the availability of traditional spectrum, spectrum sharing is set to become increasingly part of the connectivity landscape. However, sharing always means a compromise of some kind – there are always technical and regulatory challenges to overcome, and restrictions or limits of some kind need to be put into place in order to ensure the protection of all users from harmful interference. The trick is to ensure that even with these compromises, sharing still leads to a ‘win-win’ scenario for the players involved and ensures that the overall value of the spectrum being shared is maximised. This session will look at the increasing importance that spectrum sharing will play in meeting future connectivity requirements, and at how technological and regulatory advances can help to ultimately deliver a successful sharing environment. It will explore different sharing models and techniques, including dynamic access, cognitive radio technologies, licensed shared access models, geographic sharing and unlicensed models like CBRS (including its new iteration ‘CBRS 2.0’, discussed in the previous session); and explore models for both sharing between different commercial users and also between commercial and federal users. How successful has spectrum sharing been to date, what lessons have been learnt, and what needs to be done to ensure sharing of spectrum results in a ‘win-win’ and not a ‘lose-lose’ scenario?
 

  • What different sharing models and approaches are currently in use across North America and what results are being seen?
  • How may sharing models evolve in the future, and what impact could advancements in technologies (such as Next Generation Massive MIMO & AI Driven Systems, Dynamic Adjustable Antennas) have on this?
  • What actions have been set out as part of the ‘moonshot’ effort to advance dynamic spectrum sharing?
  • Is the attention that is being given to dynamic sharing specifically justified? How are existing dynamic sharing models working and what evidence has been seen to date on how successful they can be?
  • What particular technical and regulatory challenges arise when considering shared solutions involving mobile services alongside any other users? What options and mechanisms are being used to overcome these and how successful have they been?
  • Can sharing of this type involving mobile services ever be a win-win; or are the limits that are required in order to facilitate interference-free coexistence with other services always going to be too restrictive and significantly affect the usefulness of the spectrum?
  • Do the characteristics of mmWave spectrum lend itself to a shared solution where it is used for IMT in dense, urban areas, and then other users in more rural areas? How could this work in practice?
  • What bands offer most potential for the introduction of a shared approach in the future? Could there still be an option for introducing sharing in the upper 6GHz – either indoor/outdoor (allowing high-powered outdoor use and indoor unlicenced) or some kind of CBRS approach?
09:00 - 09:20
Keynote Presentation
09:20 - 10:15
Session 7: The continuing path towards ubiquitous connectivity – subsidy programs and enabling technology options

Earlier this year, the FCC announced plans to relaunch the 5G Fund for Rural America, proposing an initial allocation of up to $9 billion to enhance voice and 5G mobile broadband access in rural areas. This comes on the back of a number of other existing programs and initiatives, including the Broadband Equity, Access and Deployment (BEAD) Program, for which funds are still being allocated. This session will explore the different initiatives and programs that are being seen, and look at how they can be coordinated to ensure that the available funding is allocated in the most efficient and effective way. The session will also seek to shine a light on the different technology options that are available to provide the required connectivity (for example fiber, satellite, 5G/fixed wireless access), the pros and cons of each in terms of performance/speed, and also cost/affordability, and how each is bring prioritised as part of subsidy programs.
 

  • What subsidy programmes are currently being seen to help boost connectivity in rural areas across the US, and what programs may emerge in the near future? What subsidies are available to improve mobile services?
  • What approaches are being seen in other countries across the regions, and how do these approaches compare to that seen in the US?
  • What is the latest state of play with the 5G Fund for Rural America and what is the expected timeline that lies ahead? Have the previous challenges relating to the coverage maps now been overcome?
  • With so many different programmes and initiatives underway, how can these come together and complement each other to ensure the available funding is allocated in the most efficient and effective way?
  • How is the issue of affordability being handled alongside that of ubiquity? How can it be ensured that communities are actually able to afford the connectivity that is being provided?
  • What role can different connectivity technologies (fiber, satellite, 5G/fixed wireless access) play in part of the solution to connect rural areas? How are each of these being prioritised as part of recent programs and initiatives and what technology mix can be expected going forward? To what extent should satellite and wireless connectivity be included in the next ‘wave’ of subsidies alongside fiber solutions?
  • What new technologies are emerging that can play a part in connecting the unconnected?
10:15 - 11:20
Session 8: Spectrum for 5G Advanced and 6G – developing a roadmap to ensure global leadership

Work has begun in earnest on exploring options for the key bands that will form the basis of the initial primary and pioneer spectrum for the rollout of 6G services. The initial CPM for WRC-27 identified the 7125 – 8500 MHz and 14.8 – 15.35 GHz bands to be studied for potential IMT identification in region 2, and alongside this, work is taking place across the US and North America to explore the release of other future bands, including the 4.4 – 4.8 GHz and the 12.7 – 13.2 GHz. There is debate on some of these bands however as to whether they will be specifically for 6G, or whether the pressing need for additional spectrum to facilitate the continued growth of 5G Advanced may mean that they are brought in as part of an earlier pipeline to meet needs here. Against this backdrop, this session will look at the work that is taking place towards developing a spectrum roadmap for 6G to ensure global leadership for North America, but also looking more broadly at how this can be balanced with the shorter-term requirements to also meet growing needs of 5G Advanced, as well as of course to consider the requirements of other future connectivity technologies. It will also explore how the way in which spectrum may be used could evolve as we move towards 6G, and at how technology and policy advances can be used to deliver a forward-looking approach that enables the needs of all emerging new use cases to be met as efficiently as possible.
 

  • What do stakeholders across the US, Canada and the wider Americas need to be doing now to develop a spectrum roadmap that puts them on a path to global leadership when it comes to 6G, whilst also considering the growing connectivity needs of 5G Advanced in the shorter term?
  • What role do policymakers and industry need to play in this, and should decisions taken and the path ahead ultimately be policy or technology led?
  • What is 6G and how will it utilise spectrum? Can it be developed in a way that it will help us to use spectrum in more efficient ways?
  • What new services and use cases is 6G expect to support that are not possible with 4G and 5G, and what are the spectrum requirements corresponding to these?
  • What will be the spectrum requirements for an introduction of 6G mass market to meet both capacity and coverage needs? When will this bandwidth be required?
  • How can the needs for spectrum to meet the next generations of mobile connectivity be balanced with the needs of other future connectivity technologies to ensure the requirements of everyone are met?
  • What bands are being considered as possible options for 6G alongside the candidate bands that have been identified for study for IMT use in region 2 ahead of WRC-27 (7125 – 8500 MHz and 14.8 – 15.35 GHz)?
  • What challenges exist in freeing up spectrum in these respective bands and how can these be overcome?
  • What are likely to ultimately be the key bands for 6G? What mix of low, mid and high bands will be required?
11:20 - 11:45
Refreshment Break
11:45 - 12:50
Session 9: Delivering a forward-looking spectrum framework for an evolving Satellite Sector

The satellite sector is transforming. It is undoubtably in the middle of a period of rapid evolution. New players are disrupting the market, services and delivery methods are evolving, innovative business models are emerging, and consolidation is sweeping through the sector. This session dives into this ongoing transformation, examining its current impact and future trajectory. We’ll explore how this evolution is reshaping connectivity and spectrum needs, including access, utilization, and licensing models. We’ll also analyze how regulators are addressing these challenges and what’s needed to ensure flexible licensing, continued innovation, and equitable access for all satellites.
 

  • How is the satellite industry transforming, and what does this mean for the spectrum requirements for the sector and the framework that governs this?
  • What specific licencing challenges are being raised by the huge increase in NGSO constellations that are being seen today? How can it be ensured that a regulatory framework is in place that protects the rights of GSOs and other existing users?
  • What work is taking place around the world to explore the adaptation of existing regulatory frameworks and systems to take these into account, and who is taking the lead?
  • What licensing models and rules are being considered to ensure the protection of spectrum rights for both incumbent users and new market entrants, promote long-term sustainability, ensure equitable access, and facilitate rational and compatible utilisation of orbital and spectrum resources?
  • How can regulators work at a national, regional and global level to deliver forward looking spectrum policies for the Americas region?
  • Is satellite spectrum going to become scarce? If so, then how should this be tackled – should there be a push for more satellite spectrum, or should we be looking for better coordination and efficiency? If the latter, then what mechanisms could be available to deliver these?
12:50 - 13:45
Lunch
13:45 - 14:50
Session 10: Direct-to-Device & Hybrid Connectivity – progress made and challenges remaining

Earlier this year, the US became the first country in the world to formalise their regulatory framework for satellite-to-mobile direct-to-device satellite services, when they issued their Supplemental Coverage from Space (SCS) order. The order allows satellite operators to use mobile spectrum to keep smartphone users connected outside traditional cell tower coverage, whilst also looking to protecting companies providing Mobile Satellite Services (MSS) with conventional satellite frequencies and other terrestrial telco by stating that these SCS providers will operate as a secondary service to these primary users. This session will discuss the key elements of the SCS framework, look at how the ecosystem in this area has started to develop since it was adopted, and discuss the challenges and issues that still need to be addressed. It will explore the progress that is being seen in other countries looking to develop a similar framework to facilitate D2D connectivity, and at the expected long-term future of this exciting new approach for hybrid connectivity.
 

  • What are the key elements of the FCC’s Supplemental Coverage from Space (SCS) regulatory framework, and what impact can this have on driving forward the potential of direct-to-device connectivity?
  • Does the framework go far enough to ensure the protection against interference for companies providing MSS with conventional frequencies and other users?
  • What work is taking place in other countries across the region and globally to enable and licence new D2D services?
  • What challenges and issues still remain to be addressed, and what progress is being made in this area?
  • Ultimately, will one approach to accessing spectrum emerge as the dominant one for ‘direct to device’ satellite connectivity services (using either traditional mobile or satellite bands), and if so then which has the greatest chance for success?
  • What are now the next steps for companies looking to provide direct-to-device connectivity, and is a framework now in place that enables its potential to be realised?
  • What decisions are set to be taken relating to D2D connectivity as part of agenda item 1.13; and how may this affect the emerging ecosystem?
14:50 - 16:05
Session 11: Maximising the efficiency and value of key UHF spectrum

Efforts are continuing to transition to the next generation of broadcast services. The industry is steadily migrating to ATSC 3.0, the “NextGen” standard launched in 2019, with initiatives like the FCC and NAB’s “Future of Television” pushing for wider adoption. However, another path is emerging with local trials of 5G Broadcast, a new technology standardized by the 3GPP, that allows for broadcast and multicast services over various networks. This session will delve into how both ATSC 3.0 and 5G Broadcast are developing and how there will fit into the next generation broadcast landscape, and into the 5G ecosystem more broadly. It will also look at the how other key users of UHF such as PMSE are also transitioning to next generation technologies, and at what needs to be done to ensure that their future connectivity needs are met, whilst also maximising the efficiency and value of key UHF spectrum.
 

  • What is the future for traditional broadcast models in both the short-term and the long-term, and how may spectrum needs evolve in the future?
  • What progress has been seen with the transition to ATSC 3.0, and what is expected in the future? What factors have been driving this, and how may these impact the shape of ATSC 3.0 going forward?
  • What trials of 5G Broadcasting have taken place and what results have been seen? What could be the potential impact of integrating broadcast into 5G and what would the impact of this be for stakeholders?
  • How could these 2 different NextGen standards fit together? Could there be scope for the 2 to co-exist in the future, or is it more likely that a single NextGen broadcasting standard will emerge?
  • What does all this mean for the future of the 500MHz spectrum band, the UHF frequencies more broadly and other key users in the band such as PMSE?
  • With a possible ‘incentive auction 2.0’ recently raised by Commissioner Carr, what could the impact of this be? How much spectrum could potentially be released, and what challenges would need to be overcome?
  • What developments are being seen within WMAS (wireless multi-channel audio system) and other technologies for PMSE, and how can it be ensured that the connectivity needs of PMSE and other key UHF users continue to be met?
16:05 - 16:25
Refreshment Break
16:25 - 17:30
Session 12: Private networks – meeting the needs of vertical users and private networks

As the digitisation of industry continues, so does the demand for localized private networks in order to deliver the bespoke connectivity that is required in order to best meet the specific use cases of different vertical sectors. A number of different approaches and models are being seen, including shared mechanisms, spectrum set-asides and licensed approaches set up by public mobile operators. This session will look at the pros and cons of the different approaches that are being seen. It will explore specifically the situation across North America, where spectrum in the CBRS and 900MHz bands are amongst the options being considered to meet the needs of different sectors and use cases. What ongoing work is taking place in this area to identify different approaches, models and spectrum bands; what examples of private networks are already being seen; and what will be the long-term shape of private networks across the region?
 

  • What approaches are being seen to meet the needs of verticals and private networks in the US, Canada and across the broader Americas?
  • How does this compare to approaches that are being seen in other regions around the world?
  • What different bands can be part of delivering the required connectivity? How successful has the shared approach seen in the CBRS band been, and what role could other bands such as the 900MHz play in the longer-term?
  • How can the spectrum needs for emerging private networks be met? Should regulators be considering ‘set-asides’ in order to deliver the required bandwidth, and if so, then in which bands should this be explored?
  • What are the pros and cons of utilising licenced and unlicenced solutions respectively to deliver vertical connectivity needs?
  • How is the ecosystem developing, and what new players are emerging alongside traditional carriers?
Select date to see events.

Event Information

Where is the conference being held?
This year’s conference will be held at The Washington Plaza Hotel, 10 Thomas Circle, NW, 20005. Sign up to our newsletter to keep up to date with event announcements.
There are registration fees for certain organisation types, you can find further information on the costs here. Registration is now open, you can register for the event here.
You can find more information on the Global Spectrum Series newsletter here.

The Washington Plaza Hotel

10 Thomas Circle, NW

Washington D.C. 20005

If you would like to stay at The Washington Plaza, please use this link to book to receive our exclusive preferential rate.

Costs

This event is taking place as a fully in-person event in Washington DC. Please see below the registration fees – Registration is now open. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us [email protected].

Organisation Type
Early Bird*
Cost
Corporate
Applies to: Corporate Organisation
Early Bird:
$699
Standard:
$799
Reduced
Applies to: Not for Profit / NGO, Regulator, National Authorites, Government Agency
Early Bird:
$499
Standard:
$599
Academic / Student
Applies to: Students / Academia
Early Bird:
$300
Standard:
$350
Complimentary
Applies to: FCC / NTIA, Press / Media
Early Bird:
FREE
Standard:
FREE

*Early bird pricing ends on 6th September 2023

* Early bird prices are available until August 20th

Get Involved - Sponsorship Opportunities

This event is taking place as part of the Global Spectrum Series, for further information on speaking, sponsorship or visibility opportunities, and to discuss how you can maximize the value of involvement, please contact Jordan Francombe on [email protected] or on +44 7389 889334.

Contact

For more information on any aspect of this event, please contact Jordan Francombe using any of the following details:

Jordan Francombe, Senior Event Manager, Forum Global

[email protected]

Tel: +44 7389 889334

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Registration

Please kindly note that this event will take place as an in-person only event. There will be no virtual element to this event, so please only register if you are able to physically participate in Washington D.C.

Please see below for the registration fees:

Organisation Type
Early Bird*
Cost
Corporate
Applies to: Corporate Organisation
Early Bird:
$699
Standard:
$799
Reduced
Applies to: Not for Profit / NGO, Regulator, National Authorites, Government Agency
Early Bird:
$499
Standard:
$599
Academic / Student
Applies to: Students / Academia
Early Bird:
$300
Standard:
$350
Complimentary
Applies to: FCC / NTIA, Press / Media
Early Bird:
FREE
Standard:
FREE

*Early bird pricing ends on 6th September 2023

* Early bird prices are available until August 20th